5/5
5/5

OMG!! Early reviews say this is a blockbuster of a novel. Long-awaited next Rothstein novel coming June 3.  For sneak peak of Chapter 1, click on book cover.

5/5
The Salvation Project

His name is Sparky. He’s 4 years old, and wise beyond his years

What I’m reading

Outpedaling the Big C: My Healing Cycle Across America by Elizabeth McGowan

Elizabeth is a Pulitzer Prize-winner Elizabeth McGowan, who survived melanoma and decided to  bicycle from America’s west to east coast to raise funds for the western Wisconsin cancer center that treated her. It’s a wonderful saga of survival, endurance, and a gallery of interesting people she met along the nation’s longest biking trail.

 

The Night Agent by Matthew Quirk 

The reviews say that this is a political thriller reminiscent of early novels by John Grisham and David Baldacci. Since I write political thrillers and read a lot of them I looked forward to this one. But 25% into it I don’t see it. So I set it aside to read McGowan’s work. I’ll give Quirk one more try, but so far it’s been a disappointment.

What I’ve Just Read

1984 by George Orwell

A re-read, actually. Maybe a third re-read. Incredibly, 1984 still shows up on New York Times and other best seller lists. Why? Because the warning sirens that blast through its pages are as loud and ominous today as when it was first published in 1949. Doublespeak. Big Brother. Hate Week. War without end. Jarring.

Endurance: Shackleton’s Incredible Voyage by Alfred Lansing

By coincidence, this was a selection by my book club just a few months before the sunken ship was found under the Antarctica ice. After reading about this amazing adventure I was all worn out. Surviving 10 months with their ship frozen in the ice pack was just the easy part. Then there was passage through endless hurricane weather on lifeboats to find a small rock island. Followed by an 800 mile lifeboat trip to the closest whaling station. Followed by a trek across a mountain range that even experienced climbers could not complete. “Incredible” hardly describes it.

The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt’s New World by Andrea Wulf

Did you ever wonder why so many places are named “Humboldt?” Read this book. Alexander von Humboldt was an explorer who from 1788 to 1804 mapped the Americas from a scientific point of view: botanical, geographical, metrological, magnetic. He counseled President Thomas Jefferson about the American west. He mapped passages from the Atlantic to the Pacific through Panama and Nicaragua. He’s considered the founder of the field of metrology. He described the phenomena of human-induced climate change. He wrote a multivolume treatise which he titled, “Kosmos,” describing the universe as one interacting entity. His contributions to so many fields of human activity were amazing. Just as amazing—hardly anyone living today knows anything about him.

etc.

Like most people outside Russia I’m so impressed and heartened that Ukranians are fighting so hard for their freedom and independence. They are willing to die for democracy. Isn’t their bravery a stark contrast with U.S. Republican politicians who are so timid about preserving democracy that they won’t even stand up to Trump’s overt campaign to undermine ours.

I feel a personal attachment to the events in Ukraine. My mother was born in Odessa.

Help me understand this: Polls show that large majorities of Americans want an improved health care system, more action to combat climate change, universal kindergarten and safe and affordable child care, a fairer tax system, and other reforms Democratic legislators are attempting to enact. Those reforms are being blocked by nearly every Republican in Congress. The result, according the polls: voters are angry with Democrats for not getting it done and would replace them with Republican majorities. Why does this make sense? To throw out those trying to do what you want done and elect those who don’t? Shouldn’t the obvious answer be to elect stronger Democratic majorities?

Comments? Criticism? Advice?

Your contact information appreciated but optional

Why I Write

Joe Rothstein’

Welcome to my corner of the Internet. It’s where I talk about my novels and about current events. I have a lot to discuss.

 

I sat down to write my first book when I was in my 20s. It didn’t take long for me to realize that I could not write a book because I had nothing useful to say. I’d have to live my life first. Among other things, between then and now:

 

–I was the advance man for a traveling automobile stunt show. In the act I was “Suicide Saunders.” (That’s my next book). 

 

–I sat, as an aide to the governor of Alaska, in the private quarters of the top military commander in Alaska, while he clutched a red telephone expecting a call telling him we were at nuclear war with Russia over the Cuban missile crisis. 

 

–I experienced the most powerful earthquake in U.S. history, in Alaska, and worked on rebuilding in the aftermath.

 

–I became editor of a daily newspaper, The Anchorage Daily News, before I was 30.

 

–I flew as a passenger with the Navy’s Blue Angels (and have the photo to prove it).

 

—-As chief of staff of a United States Senator I was deeply involved in the Pentagon Papers episode.

 

–I was political consultant to Congressman Peter Rodino of New Jersey as he presided of Richard Nixon’s impeachment.

 

–I worked as strategist and media producer to help elect and re-elect nine U.S. Senators, dozens of members of Congress, and countless other candidates.

 

–I’ve started five businesses, one which went public, and another that’s become an important Internet news distribution service.

 

–Also, I’ve had the experience of raising four sons and, among other things, coaching their Little League baseball team, which was one of the most intense political experiences I’ve ever had.

 

And now, in my 80s, I’ve written three novels with two more in progress. Having something to say no longer is an obstacle.

 

My first three novels feature a charismatic Mexican-American heiress who becomes the president of the United States and is confronted with a series of events like none other in U.S. history.

 

I hope you enjoy them. And if my words and thoughts in these novels and my current events blogs prompt responses from you, please share them with me at jrothstein@rothstein.net.

Newsletter

Want Joe’s opinion blogs delivered by email. Just give us your address here.

The Salvation Project

His name is Sparky. He’s 4 years old, and wise beyond his years

What I’m reading

Outpedaling the Big C: My Healing Cycle Across America by Elizabeth McGowan

Elizabeth is a Pulitzer Prize-winner Elizabeth McGowan, who survived melanoma and decided to  bicycle from America’s west to east coast to raise funds for the western Wisconsin cancer center that treated her. It’s a wonderful saga of survival, endurance, and a gallery of interesting people she met along the nation’s longest biking trail.

 

The Night Agent by Matthew Quirk 

The reviews say that this is a political thriller reminiscent of early novels by John Grisham and David Baldacci. Since I write political thrillers and read a lot of them I looked forward to this one. But 25% into it I don’t see it. So I set it aside to read McGowan’s work. I’ll give Quirk one more try, but so far it’s been a disappointment.

What I’ve Just Read

1984 by George Orwell

A re-read, actually. Maybe a third re-read. Incredibly, 1984 still shows up on New York Times and other best seller lists. Why? Because the warning sirens that blast through its pages are as loud and ominous today as when it was first published in 1949. Doublespeak. Big Brother. Hate Week. War without end. Jarring.

Endurance: Shackleton’s Incredible Voyage by Alfred Lansing

By coincidence, this was a selection by my book club just a few months before the sunken ship was found under the Antarctica ice. After reading about this amazing adventure I was all worn out. Surviving 10 months with their ship frozen in the ice pack was just the easy part. Then there was passage through endless hurricane weather on lifeboats to find a small rock island. Followed by an 800 mile lifeboat trip to the closest whaling station. Followed by a trek across a mountain range that even experienced climbers could not complete. “Incredible” hardly describes it.

The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt’s New World by Andrea Wulf

Did you ever wonder why so many places are named “Humboldt?” Read this book. Alexander von Humboldt was an explorer who from 1788 to 1804 mapped the Americas from a scientific point of view: botanical, geographical, metrological, magnetic. He counseled President Thomas Jefferson about the American west. He mapped passages from the Atlantic to the Pacific through Panama and Nicaragua. He’s considered the founder of the field of metrology. He described the phenomena of human-induced climate change. He wrote a multivolume treatise which he titled, “Kosmos,” describing the universe as one interacting entity. His contributions to so many fields of human activity were amazing. Just as amazing—hardly anyone living today knows anything about him.

etc.

Like most people outside Russia I’m so impressed and heartened that Ukranians are fighting so hard for their freedom and independence. They are willing to die for democracy. Isn’t their bravery a stark contrast with U.S. Republican politicians who are so timid about preserving democracy that they won’t even stand up to Trump’s overt campaign to undermine ours.

I feel a personal attachment to the events in Ukraine. My mother was born in Odessa.

Help me understand this: Polls show that large majorities of Americans want an improved health care system, more action to combat climate change, universal kindergarten and safe and affordable child care, a fairer tax system, and other reforms Democratic legislators are attempting to enact. Those reforms are being blocked by nearly every Republican in Congress. The result, according the polls: voters are angry with Democrats for not getting it done and would replace them with Republican majorities. Why does this make sense? To throw out those trying to do what you want done and elect those who don’t? Shouldn’t the obvious answer be to elect stronger Democratic majorities?

Comments? Criticism? Advice?

Your contact information appreciated but optional

5/5
5/5

OMG!! Early reviews say this is a blockbuster of a novel. Long-awaited next Rothstein novel coming June 3.  For sneak peak of Chapter 1, click on book cover.

5/5

Why I Write

Joe Rothstein’

Welcome to my corner of the Internet. It’s where I talk about my novels and about current events. I have a lot to discuss.

 

I sat down to write my first book when I was in my 20s. It didn’t take long for me to realize that I could not write a book because I had nothing useful to say. I’d have to live my life first. Among other things, between then and now:

 

–I was the advance man for a traveling automobile stunt show. In the act I was “Suicide Saunders.” (That’s my next book). 

 

–I sat, as an aide to the governor of Alaska, in the private quarters of the top military commander in Alaska, while he clutched a red telephone expecting a call telling him we were at nuclear war with Russia over the Cuban missile crisis. 

 

–I experienced the most powerful earthquake in U.S. history, in Alaska, and worked on rebuilding in the aftermath.

 

–I became editor of a daily newspaper, The Anchorage Daily News, before I was 30.

 

–I flew as a passenger with the Navy’s Blue Angels (and have the photo to prove it).

 

—-As chief of staff of a United States Senator I was deeply involved in the Pentagon Papers episode.

 

–I was political consultant to Congressman Peter Rodino of New Jersey as he presided of Richard Nixon’s impeachment.

 

–I worked as strategist and media producer to help elect and re-elect nine U.S. Senators, dozens of members of Congress, and countless other candidates.

 

–I’ve started five businesses, one which went public, and another that’s become an important Internet news distribution service.

 

–Also, I’ve had the experience of raising four sons and, among other things, coaching their Little League baseball team, which was one of the most intense political experiences I’ve ever had.

 

And now, in my 80s, I’ve written three novels with two more in progress. Having something to say no longer is an obstacle.

 

My first three novels feature a charismatic Mexican-American heiress who becomes the president of the United States and is confronted with a series of events like none other in U.S. history.

 

I hope you enjoy them. And if my words and thoughts in these novels and my current events blogs prompt responses from you, please share them with me at jrothstein@rothstein.net.

Newsletter

Want Joe’s opinion blogs delivered by email. Just give us your address here.